Drexel among top 100 universities in utility patents worldwide

Drexel University jumped 18 spots to #52 in the world in 2017 for utility patents – patents that cover new products – granted in the U.S.

The National Academy of Inventors and Intellectual Property Owners Association releases its Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility report each year. It is based on the number of patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to universities.

“Our consistent ranking in this global group of institutions is an illustration of the creative, intellectual and productive nature of our talented faculty, and the Drexel Ventures team’s commitment to supporting them through the management and commercialization of the University’s intellectual property,” said Senior Vice President for Corporate Relations and Economic Development Keith Orris in a press release.

Drexel’s patents have covered a broad spectrum of categories, including tumor detection development, a drug that treats Parkinson’s disease, and a multi-touch piano keyboard.

Drexel is one of nearly 100 colleges and universities in the 11-county region that are driving innovation and growth in Greater Philadelphia.

SEPTA among few U.S. agencies to meet safety deadlines

SEPTA is one of few railroad agencies in the U.S. to have all of its Positive Train Control (PTC) systems fully in place by deadlines set by congress. This includes 100 percent of its locomotives equipped, employees trained, and track rigged to run with PTC.

PTC systems are structures put in place to automatically control the speed of a train; they play an important role in preventing human error. SEPTA has PTC implemented on all of their commuter rail lines.

According to Philly.com, the reason why SEPTA is ahead of other U.S. rail systems is due to numerous factors, including a consistent management team that oversaw the installation process from start to finish.

SEPTA is currently working to implement the safety standards on their freight rails, which only run at night. SEPTA’s full range of transportation options, including trolleys, subways, regional rail and busses, helped Philadelphia’s public transportation rank 9th in the nation.

 

Penn launches first neuroaesthetics center in U.S.

Penn Medicine launched a research center for neuroaesthetics earlier this month, the first of its kind in the U.S.

As the field of neuroscience develops, researchers are hoping to gain deeper insight into the relationship between neurobiology and aesthetics. The center will help develop further understanding into how our aesthetic biology influences our decisions on choosing partners, how we consume, and what we find appealing in design.

“This center allows us to bring together, build upon and advance knowledge of the mysterious world of aesthetic experiences,” said neurologist Anjan Chatterjee, leader of the new center, in a Philly Voice article. “Our goal is to evolve basic and translational research, educate the next generation of scholars and serve as a hub for creative experts interested in the nature and neural basis of beauty, art, and architecture.”

The center will bring together experts in psychology, neurology, business, and architecture, among others, in order to better understand a field that has little research dedicated to it. The center will also help advance Penn Medicine’s global status; it recently ranked as a top health system in the U.S..

$90 million Route 295 construction project almost complete

Route 295, which runs through Delaware, Pennsylvania and New Jersey, has undergone construction in order to improve traffic efficiency.

The final phase of construction on the project will begin next month.

“The I-295 southbound reconstruction project remains on schedule,” said Brent Van Lith, senior project engineer in a Delaware Business Now article. “With about 25 percent of the project remaining, we can see the light at the end of the tunnel.”

Total investment of improvement to the interstate will reach around $90 million.

“The goal of the whole reconstruction project is to rehabilitate the approach to roads and ramps to improve the highway’s efficiency and safety while limiting the impact on the traffic patterns and the traveling public during the construction,” a DRBA release stated. “I-295 southbound mainline traffic lanes will have 50 percent more capacity.”

Once the project is complete, commute time in the region, which is one of the lowest in the country, is expected to improve.

Port of Wilmington ranked 50th in the U.S.

The Port of Wilmington recently made its way to 50th in the nation, according to Global Trade Magazine.

The Port, which is known as a top destination for bananas, has an import/export tonnage of more than 10.5 million per year.

According to Delaware Business Now, the Port is a persistent source of good-paying blue collar jobs in a state where these careers are becoming increasingly obsolete.

In January, the Port received the first shipment of Chilean fruit to the U.S. for 2018. The shipment was stored in the refrigerated warehouse complex, one of the largest in North America, before being distributed to Canada and along the east coast. It is one of the largest entry points for Chilean fruit year round.

Camden sees uptick in demand for office space

Camden has undergone a transformation over the past decade. The city’s revitalization can be attributed to developments such as Holtec International’s headquarters, Subaru of America’s headquarters, and Liberty Property Trust’s Camden Riverfront project.

Newfound revitalization for the New Jersey city has seen a large uptick in demand for office space.

“There is a need for space,” said Anne Klein of Newmark Knight Frank in a Philadelphia Business Journal article. “As an example, One Port Center is 100 percent full and I’m constantly getting inquiries about any space coming available any time in the future. That is obviously Class A space right on the waterfront, but it’s still a desire to be in Camden.”

Many of these redevelopment projects have been fueled by Grow N.J., a job creation and incentives program that is in place to create a competitive edge for the state. As development continues to expand, demand for office space in Camden is expected to grow.

Jefferson chooses site for bioprocessing center

Thomas Jefferson University is bringing a 25,000-square-foot training center for biological manufacturing to Lower Gwynedd, PA.

The site, which is located in Spring House Innovation Park, will serve as an educational and training facility for students and professionals in biopharmaceutical and bioengineering. The new facility will be used to provide workforce training and certifications to approximately 2,500 people annually as well as serve as a catalyst for groundbreaking biotherapeutic drugs.

“The Jefferson Institute for Bioprocessing demonstrates the vision and mission of Jefferson by leveraging partnerships with industry, academia and government agencies to provide globally recognized, transdisciplinary education and training in this fast-emerging field,” said Ron Kander, Jefferson’s dean of Kanbar College of Design, in a Philadelphia Business Journal article. “Our facility at Spring House Innovation Park will utilize leading-edge biopharmaceutical manufacturing technology and support current and future workforce demands in this critically important field.”

The center is being developed in partnership with the National Institute for Bioprocessing Research and Training and is projected to open in spring of 2019. The center will contribute to the region’s powerful research and development output; contributing to Greater Philadelphia’s academic R&D expenditures which are the 7th largest in the nation.

Amazon to bring 600 jobs to New Jersey with distribution center

Amazon is planning to build a one million square-foot facility to Burlington, New Jersey, which will create 600 new jobs.

The new site will be a distribution center where employees will package and ship products across the Northeast.

“We are thrilled to join the community and look forward to building relationships and being a good employer and community neighbor for years to come,” said Amazon spokeswoman Rachael Lighty in a NJBiz article. “We look at customer demand and go close to where they are to speed our shipping time. We are constantly looking to exceed customer demand.”

Amazon chose the site due to its proximity to workforce; the company currently has more than 16,000 full-time employees in the state of New Jersey.

Delaware passes Job Creation and Innovation Act

Earlier this month, the Delaware General Assembly passed the Job Creation and Innovation Act for Small Technology Companies. This legislation will allow angel investors to provide capital to startup companies in the innovative science or high-tech fields.

The act will supply 25% in tax credit to angel investors who provide more than $10,000 to a Delaware-based science and technology company.

“As advocates for the bioscience community, we are thrilled with the creation of the angel investor tax credit,” said Helen Stimson, President and CEO of Delaware Bio, in a press release. “This will help Delaware’s existing innovative businesses grow, as well as attract new startups to locate here. The First State has one of the most robust R&D tax credits in the nation. When you consider the federal R&D tax credit and the angel investor tax credit, Delaware entrepreneurs can now access a true trifecta of benefits.”

Delaware was ranked the 5th best state in the U.S. to launch a business in 2016, according GoBankingRates.com. This legislation will make Delaware friendlier to companies that are in their initial stages.

Temple performs breakthrough in emphysema treatment

Scientists at Temple University, located in North Philadelphia, carried out a landmark clinical trial for a minimally invasive treatment of emphysema, a life-threatening lung condition most commonly linked to smoker’s lung that affects approximately 3.1 million Americans each year.

Current treatments of emphysema involve a risky procedure that consists of lung reduction surgery and can result in infection and respiratory failure. Temple’s trial, entitled LIBERATE, used an endoscopic lung reduction therapy that is far less invasive than existing treatment.

“The LIBERATE trial was designed to see whether Zephyr EBV was safe and effective over a relatively longer time frame, out to one year,” said Gerard Criner, chair and professor of thoracic medicine and surgery at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine in a Philly Voice article.

The trial resulted in reducing shortness of breath, improved lung functions, and better quality of life.

This trial is one of many medical breakthroughs coming out of Greater Philadelphia, such as CHOP’s first pediatric double hand transplant in the summer of 2016 and Penn completing the first ever robot assisted spinal surgery last fall.